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It is no secret that receivers experience trauma related to workplace bullying. Consequently, many leave their jobs as a result of bullying and also because organizations fail to intervene on their behalf.  

Once a receiver leaves, finding a new job becomes key. Receivers need to know they are at risk for taking a job in another aggressive situation. This is particularly true for professions where workplace bullying is rampant, such as nursing, social work, and education. Consequently, receivers need to be aware that the organizations they are applying to may be plagued with aggression. Receivers, therefore, need to screen potential employers for workplace bullying to ensure that they take a job with an organization that is bully free.

One of the first steps for receivers is merely to do an internet search on their potential employer. In today’s world, there are a few online sources designed to provide reviews on employers. Of course, not every organization and agency has reviews. However, it is strongly recommended that receivers do an internet search to see what, if anything is out there. 

Receivers should also have a series of questions they bring to the interview that explores how the organization manages conflict, discipline, professional development, and team-building. These questions should be asked of workers at all organizational levels so that receiver can better assess the organizational culture and the environment.

Receivers also want to investigate the general working relationships and overall job satisfaction of the employees during the interview. Using multiple sources if at all possible, receivers should find out the frequency of turnover and the reasons why the last few employees left the organization. Receivers should be skilled and weave these questions into their general interview and be aware that the information they are given should be consistent with what they are seeing. 

Receivers need to keep their eyes wide open and observe the environment during their interview. It is likely there will be signs that the organization is dealing with workplace bullying. For example, is there a worker who is actively bad mouthing other employees? Are there workers who are not speaking to one another? Is there tension between workers? Is what is being said too good to be true?  Or, are there workers not present who were supposed to be part of the interview? Do workers have their doors open or closed? Is there an area for workers to eat lunch together or have coffee?

Observing non-verbal behaviors of the workers along with truly hearing what is being said helps receivers decipher if this potential workplace is suffering from workplace aggression. All of these bits and pieces, when put together, can tell the receiver a lot about the overall organizational culture and environment.

Don’t forget to check out my survival guide which is a helpful resource that identifies effective strategies for receivers of workplace bullying. 

If you or your organization is experiencing persistent workplace aggression, contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360. You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com. Help is out there today.
It is no secret that receivers experience trauma related to workplace bullying. Consequently, many leave their jobs as a result of bullying and also because organizations fail to intervene on their behalf.  

Once a receiver leaves, finding a new job becomes key. Receivers need to know they are at risk for taking a job in another aggressive situation. This is particularly true for professions where workplace bullying is rampant, such as nursing, social work, and education. Consequently, receivers need to be aware that the organizations they are applying to may be plagued with aggression. Receivers, therefore, need to screen potential employers for workplace bullying to ensure that they take a job with an organization that is bully free.

One of the first steps for receivers is merely to do an internet search on their potential employer. In today’s world, there are a few online sources designed to provide reviews on employers. Of course, not every organization and agency has reviews. However, it is strongly recommended that receivers do an internet search to see what, if anything is out there. 

Receivers should also have a series of questions they bring to the interview that explores how the organization manages conflict, discipline, professional development, and team-building. These questions should be asked of workers at all organizational levels so that receiver can better assess the organizational culture and the environment.

Receivers also want to investigate the general working relationships and overall job satisfaction of the employees during the interview. Using multiple sources if at all possible, receivers should find out the frequency of turnover and the reasons why the last few employees left the organization. Receivers should be skilled and weave these questions into their general interview and be aware that the information they are given should be consistent with what they are seeing. 

Receivers need to keep their eyes wide open and observe the environment during their interview. It is likely there will be signs that the organization is dealing with workplace bullying. For example, is there a worker who is actively bad mouthing other employees? Are there workers who are not speaking to one another? Is there tension between workers? Is what is being said too good to be true?  Or, are there workers not present who were supposed to be part of the interview? Do workers have their doors open or closed? Is there an area for workers to eat lunch together or have coffee?

Observing non-verbal behaviors of the workers along with truly hearing what is being said helps receivers decipher if this potential workplace is suffering from workplace aggression. All of these bits and pieces, when put together, can tell the receiver a lot about the overall organizational culture and environment.

Don’t forget to check out my survival guide which is a helpful resource that identifies effective strategies for receivers of workplace bullying. 

If you or your organization is experiencing persistent workplace aggression, contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360. You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com. Help is out there today



 


Comments

Jenny
09/27/2017 9:55am

Great piece of work! I look forward to reading additional insights

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10/04/2017 6:38am

Bullying is a serious concern within the society. This act leads to millions of cases of self-pity, suicide, and other related incidents. I really thought that the act of bullying has no place in work since media portrays it as for kids only. I really believe now that bullying should be a priority of concern since it also happens any places and situations. We must give priority on how these acts should raise awareness and give solutions to it. The institutions, also must act and intervene with these issues because it could give an impact not only for these victims but also for the image and moral of the company.

Reply
10/02/2017 2:10am

Work place is important plat form for working with the team. If we want to become sucess in work them try to keep the focus on work and avoid the gossips with friends.

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