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It is no secret that receivers experience trauma related to workplace bullying. Consequently, many leave their jobs as a result of bullying and also because organizations fail to intervene on their behalf.  

Once a receiver leaves, finding a new job becomes key. Receivers need to know they are at risk for taking a job in another aggressive situation. This is particularly true for professions where workplace bullying is rampant, such as nursing, social work, and education. Consequently, receivers need to be aware that the organizations they are applying to may be plagued with aggression. Receivers, therefore, need to screen potential employers for workplace bullying to ensure that they take a job with an organization that is bully free.

One of the first steps for receivers is merely to do an internet search on their potential employer. In today’s world, there are a few online sources designed to provide reviews on employers. Of course, not every organization and agency has reviews. However, it is strongly recommended that receivers do an internet search to see what, if anything is out there. 

Receivers should also have a series of questions they bring to the interview that explores how the organization manages conflict, discipline, professional development, and team-building. These questions should be asked of workers at all organizational levels so that receiver can better assess the organizational culture and the environment.

Receivers also want to investigate the general working relationships and overall job satisfaction of the employees during the interview. Using multiple sources if at all possible, receivers should find out the frequency of turnover and the reasons why the last few employees left the organization. Receivers should be skilled and weave these questions into their general interview and be aware that the information they are given should be consistent with what they are seeing. 

Receivers need to keep their eyes wide open and observe the environment during their interview. It is likely there will be signs that the organization is dealing with workplace bullying. For example, is there a worker who is actively bad mouthing other employees? Are there workers who are not speaking to one another? Is there tension between workers? Is what is being said too good to be true?  Or, are there workers not present who were supposed to be part of the interview? Do workers have their doors open or closed? Is there an area for workers to eat lunch together or have coffee?

Observing non-verbal behaviors of the workers along with truly hearing what is being said helps receivers decipher if this potential workplace is suffering from workplace aggression. All of these bits and pieces, when put together, can tell the receiver a lot about the overall organizational culture and environment.

Don’t forget to check out my survival guide which is a helpful resource that identifies effective strategies for receivers of workplace bullying. 

If you or your organization is experiencing persistent workplace aggression, contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360. You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com. Help is out there today.
It is no secret that receivers experience trauma related to workplace bullying. Consequently, many leave their jobs as a result of bullying and also because organizations fail to intervene on their behalf.  

Once a receiver leaves, finding a new job becomes key. Receivers need to know they are at risk for taking a job in another aggressive situation. This is particularly true for professions where workplace bullying is rampant, such as nursing, social work, and education. Consequently, receivers need to be aware that the organizations they are applying to may be plagued with aggression. Receivers, therefore, need to screen potential employers for workplace bullying to ensure that they take a job with an organization that is bully free.

One of the first steps for receivers is merely to do an internet search on their potential employer. In today’s world, there are a few online sources designed to provide reviews on employers. Of course, not every organization and agency has reviews. However, it is strongly recommended that receivers do an internet search to see what, if anything is out there. 

Receivers should also have a series of questions they bring to the interview that explores how the organization manages conflict, discipline, professional development, and team-building. These questions should be asked of workers at all organizational levels so that receiver can better assess the organizational culture and the environment.

Receivers also want to investigate the general working relationships and overall job satisfaction of the employees during the interview. Using multiple sources if at all possible, receivers should find out the frequency of turnover and the reasons why the last few employees left the organization. Receivers should be skilled and weave these questions into their general interview and be aware that the information they are given should be consistent with what they are seeing. 

Receivers need to keep their eyes wide open and observe the environment during their interview. It is likely there will be signs that the organization is dealing with workplace bullying. For example, is there a worker who is actively bad mouthing other employees? Are there workers who are not speaking to one another? Is there tension between workers? Is what is being said too good to be true?  Or, are there workers not present who were supposed to be part of the interview? Do workers have their doors open or closed? Is there an area for workers to eat lunch together or have coffee?

Observing non-verbal behaviors of the workers along with truly hearing what is being said helps receivers decipher if this potential workplace is suffering from workplace aggression. All of these bits and pieces, when put together, can tell the receiver a lot about the overall organizational culture and environment.

Don’t forget to check out my survival guide which is a helpful resource that identifies effective strategies for receivers of workplace bullying. 

If you or your organization is experiencing persistent workplace aggression, contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360. You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com. Help is out there today



 
 
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The workplace bullying environment is difficult for receivers to continue to work in, especially when they are not believed.  As such, leaving is often considered and recommended by experts.  Leaving isn’t always an option and many receivers stay.  However, even if a worker leaves, there are continued risks that must be considered.

One of these risks is about references.  Getting a reference from one’s place of employment is important and often a necessity in obtaining another position.  For the receiver of workplace bullying, references can be extremely problematic to attain after leaving.  Many times the receiver leaves because they are not believed and/or are viewed as the problem. This makes getting a positive reference problematic.

On many applications, there is an option whether the potential employer has permission to contact to previous places of employment.  In normal circumstances, workers mark yes, but surviving a workplace bullying culture is not normal.  For the receiver of workplace bullying, marking yes or no can be tricky.

Marking yes means receivers are at-risk for receiving a negative reference from their past employer.  Marking no often requires an explanation and this requires the receiver to be creative in their reasoning.  Either is risky for the receiver.

Another problem can arise when workers complete the paperwork for a background check.  Some background checks require verification from employers about worker including dates of employment and salary.  Receivers have reported that the organizations they left as a result of bullying are refusing to verify employment.  This causes additional harm and trauma to receivers of workplace bullying.

Don’t forget to check out my survival guide which is a helpful resource that identifies effective strategies for receivers of workplace bullying. 

If you or your organization is experiencing persistent workplace aggression, contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360. You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com. Help is out there today.


 
 
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As organizations begin to better understand workplace bullying, the likelihood that they will intervene increases. However, before organizations can effectively intervene, they must understand a few key features of workplace bullying. First and foremost, organizations need to recognize that workplace bullying is different than anything else they have dealt with before. This knowledge helps organizations with the development of effective tools to cope with bullying. Strategies need to be creative, hold the bully accountable, help the environment heal, and ensure that aggression does not continue. Interventions should be revisited to ensure that they are doing what is expected.

Organizations must also realize that the work environment will most likely get worse before it gets better. When bullies are held accountable, they push back and retaliate because intervention means they are losing their control over the culture. Aggressors become more covert and underhanded. Aggressors will also put increased pressure on bystanders to participate more in the bullying which makes it more difficult to identify who is perpetrating the violence. Leadership and organizations must plan their intervention strategies accordingly. This should include preparation for retaliation from the aggressor and bystanders. A clear means to protect witnesses and receivers from retaliation and further bullying must be incorporated into interventions. 

Organizations often fail to recognize the complexity of workplace bullying and as such, they intervene only on one level. The most common strategy used by organizations is to intervene with the receiver. This increases workplace bullying causing additional harm and failing to address the real problem. Organizations need to fully understand that the workplace bullying culture is multi-faceted and includes the organization, the aggressor, the receiver, and the witnesses. As such, there needs to be systematic intervention tactics on each level to successfully manage, stop, and prevent workplace bullying. 

If your organization is experiencing workplace bullying, I can help develop effective interventions and strategies to stop and prevent workplace bullying. Contact me at jankircher@jankircher.com or (320) 309-2360.  You can also visit my website at www.jankircher.com.  Remember, help is out there.